Bike Accident Lawyers 

Experienced. Reliable. Client-Focused.

Our Pittsburgh lawyers help bicyclists throughout Western PA.  We apply decades of experience to fight for top dollar for your injuries. We are methodical and effective, but also sensitive to your predicament and unfamiliarity with legal process.   

 

 

One bike injury client wrote: "I don't think I'll ever be able to express the extent of my gratitude. I can say, without hyperbole, that you've changed my life for the better. I offer a sincere thank you." Ross M. Click here to read more reviews.  

 

Never A Fee Unless We Win

We talk to you over the phone and come to your home or hospital room.  

 

Let's Get Started

Call any time or read answers to frequently asked questions, below. 

 

412.780.0008

 





Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Phone # and Best Time to Call You

Your Message

captcha

Please leave this field empty.

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

For what things can I be compensated?
Serious injuries to a bicyclist will garner the highest settlements, of course.  These include hospitalization and significant claims for lost wages and lost earning capacity, from brain damage (serious concussions), and/or broken bones and/or deep cuts that result in serious scar or disfigurement.  
However, the focus of our bicycle accident law practice is getting top dollar for all claims, not just the serious ones, by making the insurance company (or judge or jury) see the full nature of how the accident changed your life.  We make the party responsible to pay for your injuries feel like he or she lived a day in your post-injury life.  We make them know exactly how the injury -- even if not life threatening -- caused you pain, inconvenience, limitation, and an interruption to the life you had before the injury.  We detail everything: your activity levels before and after the accident, the ability to engage in sports, outdoor activities, recreational walking, basic household chords, work functions, and even sex. 
By taking the client's point of view, and investing time to educate ourselves about all of your limitations from an accident, we seek top dollar in all cases, not just serious cases.  We have had great success in cases where there were no broken bones or serious head injuries. We apply decades of experiences to present your case in the most favorable light. 
  
Who pays for my injuries?
Your own automobile insurance covers your injuries on the road and your "no fault" or personal injury protection (PIP) covers the first $5,000 in your medical bills, or more, depending on your insurance.  The driver who hit you is otherwise responsible to pay for all of your injuries related to the accident or collision.  If said driver lacks insurance, or the insurance is not enough to cover your injuries, you can make a claim on your own underinsured (UIM) or uninsured (UM) coverage though your own policy.
 
How long do I have to file suit?
In Pennsylvania, you have two years to file suit relative to the statute of limitations. The time period is shorter (as short as six months) if your claim is against a governmental body. If, for example, you maintain that the city, county, or state was at fault (in whole or in part) for causing your injury (for things such as defective signage or light at an intersection), then you must serve formal notice of your claim or file suit against the governmental body within only six months of the accident.   
 
What happens if I am partly at fault?
Bicyclists often get blamed for the injuries.  "He cut in front of me! " a driver might say.  Or, "she came out of no where on her bike!" This, however, does not mean you are automatically barred from a significant recovery . In Pennsylvania, you are at fault for your injuries, you can still recover, so long as your fault does not exceed the fault of the person who injured you, but the amount of your recovery is reduced based on your own negligence.
So, for example, if you are biking the wrong way on a street and hit by a driver who should have seen you but was not paying attention, a jury could find that you and the driver who hit you were 50/50 at fault, in which case, the amount of the award in your favor would be cut in half.  If, however, a jury finds you were 51% at fault, you recover nothing.  Here is what the law provides, exactly:
§ 7102. Comparative negligence.
(a) General rule.--In all actions brought to recover damages for negligence resulting in death or injury to person or property, the fact that the plaintiff may have been guilty of contributory negligence shall not bar a recovery by the plaintiff or his legal representative where such negligence was not greater than the causal negligence of the defendant or defendants against whom recovery is sought, but any damages sustained by the plaintiff shall be diminished in proportion to the amount of negligence attributed to the plaintiff.
Thus, an effective and well prepared lawyer can present your case in a manner that allows you to obtain a recovery, even when you are partly at fault.
 
What type of people do you represent?
We handle biking injuries occasioned during any kind of biking . We do not limit representation to those engaged in recreational biking. We represent avid Pittsburgh bikers in riding clubs those at work, biking as a vocation as a messenger, delivery person, or riding to work.
 

Is a biking helmet required?

Adults are not required to wear a biking or riding helmet in Pennsylvania.  Only those under 12 years of age must wear a helmet, and importantly, in PA, the failure to wear a helmet cannot be used as evidence of comparative negligence. The law refers to bicycles as "pedalcycles."

§ 3510.  Pedalcycle helmets for certain persons.

(a)  General rule.--A person under 12 years of age shall not operate a pedalcycle or ride as a passenger on a pedalcycle unless the person is wearing a pedalcycle helmet meeting the standards of the American National Standards Institute, the American Society for Testing and Materials, the Snell Memorial Foundation's Standards for Protective Headgear for Use in Bicycling or any other nationally recognized standard for pedalcycle helmet approval. This subsection shall also apply to a person who rides:

(1)  upon a pedalcycle while in a restraining seat attached to a pedalcycle; or

(2)  in a trailer towed by a pedalcycle.

(b)  Helmet to be labeled.--Any helmet sold or offered for sale for use by operators and passengers of pedalcycles shall be labeled in accordance with the standard described in subsection (a), which shall constitute the manufacturer's certification that the helmet conforms to the applicable safety standards.

(b.1)  Sale of helmet.--No person shall sell or offer for sale for use by an operator or passenger of a pedalcycle a helmet which is not of a type meeting the requirements established by this section.

(b.2)  Waiver of fine.--If a person receives a citation issued by the proper authority for violation of subsection (a), a magisterial district judge, magistrate or judge shall dismiss the charges if the person prior to or at the person's hearing displays evidence of acquisition of a helmet meeting the standards prescribed in subsection (a) to such magisterial district judge, magistrate or judge. Sufficient evidence shall include a receipt mailed to the appropriate court officer which evidences purchase or transfer of such a helmet from another helmet owner, evidenced by a notarized letter.

(b.3)  Exemption.--This section shall not apply to a child under 12 years of age who can produce a statement from the family's church authorities attesting that it is against the tenets of the family's religion to wear a helmet.

(c)  Civil actions.--In no event shall a violation or alleged violation of subsection (a) be used as evidence in a trial of any civil action; nor shall any jury in a civil action be instructed that any conduct did constitute or could be interpreted by them to constitute a violation of subsection (a); nor shall failure to use a pedalcycle helmet be considered as contributory negligence nor shall failure to use a pedalcycle helmet be admissible as evidence in the trial of any civil action.

 

What is the significance of biking lanes?
Pennsylvania has biking lanes and specific trails designated for biking. Technically, drivers of cars, trucks, and other automobiles must yield the right of way to those on bikes.  Similarly, a person must check the road or sidewalk before opening a car door, to avoid opening it into the path of a biker, but people are often negligent and reckless. While the law does not prevent injury, we use the law to maximize your financial recovery to compensate you for all your injuries.  
 

In what geographic areas do you practice? 

Our Pittsburgh accident lawyers help people injured on bikes on the roadways of the City of Pittsburgh in Allegheny, County, PA, plus Beaver, Butler, Clarion, Washington, Fayette, and Westmoreland Counties.  Contact or bicycle injury attorneys any time.   
 
Parenthetically, aside from the law, you may be curious about where the majority of deaths and injuries occur when biking. Do these occur at intersections, from people running a read light? Nope.  Not at intersections.  In reality, sixty (60) percent of deaths and injuries on bikes occur away from intersections. (Citations:  see the fact sheet by clicking "here" and PA Department of Transportation Bike Injury Statistics.) Call our bicycle injury lawyers today.  

 

 

Call Any Time For a Free Consultation 

412.780.0008

 





Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Phone # and Best Time to Call You

Your Message

captcha

Please leave this field empty.